Tutorials

Needle Book & Tutorial

These Needle books are great if you do any handwork!  And they make excellent gifts since they work up fast!  Mine is made with Alison Glass Fabric.

Alison Glass Needle book

This fabric is from her Lucky Penny line and intended for a needle book, including two small panels.

(Note ~ You might not be able to find this fabric.  If you love the look check out her Field Day Fabric as an alternate! She also sells a Needle Book Kit!)

I decided to cut up the panels for a more patchwork looking book and added this bright pink fabric from my stash (part of her Handcrafted line) to make the inside pocket.

needle-book-1

My needle book measures 6 1/2″ x 4″ closed.  To make this size you will need:

Supplies:

A (4) 4 1/2″ x 7″ patches for inside and outside cover

B (1) 7 x 7 1/2″ patch for pocket

C (1) 7 1/2″ x 9″ piece of batting

D (2) 5 1/2″ x 7″ patch of wool or felt for pages

E DMC perle cotton for embellishing

Let’s get started!

Sew 4 1/2″ x 7″ fabric A patches together in pairs of two on long 7″ edge.

needle-book-2

Place one pieced A/A unit (outside cover) on batting with right side up.

needle-book-3

Baste 1/8″ seam around perimeter to secure in place for embroidery stitches.

needle-book-4

Embellish front cover using perle cotton and set aside. Note ~ I didn’t add any stitches to the second side (back cover) of my project, but you can stitch that side too if you like!

needle-book-5

Now, let’s work on the inside cover and pocket.

Fold 7″ x 7 1/2″ B patch in half on 7″ length. Sew a decorative running stitch (or other stitch) along fold edge as a decorative accent. Place on top of the second A/A unit (inside cover).

needle-book-6

The pocket will be stitched to the inside cover to make 2 individual pockets. I placed my supplies onto the B pocket to decide where my stitches should go.

needle-book-7needle-book-8Mark a line with a hera marker 2 1/4″ from the edge.
needle-book-10

Stitch pocket in place on the marked line with a running stitch of perle cotton through all layers of the pocket and inside cover.  Knot at back.

Sew 1/8″ seam around thee outside edges of pocket perimeter to secure in place.

needle-book-11

Place pocket pieces Right Sides Together and sew 1/4″ seam along perimeter, leaving opening on back cover to turn.

needle-book-12

Sew a running stitch of perle cotton on back cover of needle book on three sides to close opening and add decorative touch.  Center two wool 5 1/2″ x 7″ D patches on top of the inside cover.

needle-book-13

Continue running stitch down center along spine to secure wool pieces in place.

needle-book-14

With your needle still on the perle cotton, tie a knot near the last exit point, feed needle back into exit hole through batting and back out 1/2″ away.  Pull perle cotton through, give a sharp tug until knot embeds in batting, trim perle cotton tail off.

needle-book-15

Notice the stitching for the wool pages adds a nice detail along the spine?

needle book tutorial

Enjoy your new needle book!!!

needle book alison glass fabric

Alison Glass Needle book

If you like this post please Pin and Share!

Needle Book Tutorial

Check out my Tutorials Page for more projects!

sherri

Linking up @ Finish it Up Friday, My Quilt Infactuation, Whoop Whoop Friday & Quilting Jetgirl
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Tutorial Links:

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DIY Color Card for Fabric & Projects

I have a free diy Color Card download to share with you today.

Do you ever want to track what fabrics you used for a project or wish you had a color card?  I started tracking my projects and fabrics with my own diy color card and it’s a great reference that I go back to… a lot!  I have two methods to my madness…

First I like to track the solids I use.  When I purchase any solids, I snip off a piece of the selvage and add them to my own diy color card.  This way when I want to refer back to them or need to purchase more of a color, I have a sample to go to. This is especially helpful with solids since there is no information on the selvage to refer back to later.

diy color card for tracking fabric

I also use this diy color card for projects.  When I start a project I like to make note (or a card) of all the fabrics I’m using ~ sometimes I run out of a fabric I need and the project might sit for a while (sounds familiar right?) then when I go back to it I don’t always remember what I used… no worries, I can just check the project color card.

Here is one I made for a holiday quilt I was working on…

diy color card for fabric and sewing projects

I use a glue stick to stick the samples on ~ easy and works great!

Then I put them all in a binder neatly tucked away!

diy color card for tracking fabric ~ sewing projectI hope some of you find this useful too!  There are two versions in the PDF, one for solids or general fabric tracking and one for projects.

Click for the free PDF download:

DIY COLOR CARD FREE DOWNLOAD

If you like this post… please share!

Diy fabric color card for sewing and quilting projects

sherri

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Modern Sewciety Podcast ~ and a beginners tip for choosing fabrics!

Recently Stephanie from Modern Sewciety had me on her podcast to chat! Which was SO much fun!  I hadn’t really listened to podcasts before so I took a crash course and listened to a bunch of her shows and now I’m hooked!  I’m on episode #94 and the episode includes a second interview with Timna Tarr.

modern sewciety

Timna is an amazing long arm quilter, she’s won many accolades for her work and has an amazing eye for color!  Check out her instagram!

Stephanie’s podcasts are really nice to have running in the background while your sewing and I’ve picked up some fun tips and great information along the way too!  So thank you Stephanie for bringing all that to your listeners.  If your on instagram, you can follow Stephanie @ Modern Sewciety!

Here’s another podcast interview with two of my favorite fabric designers…

interview with Tula Pink and Alison Glass

While Stephanie and I were chatting we talked a little bit about picking out fabric so I thought I’d share a tip for beginners who might be struggling with fabric choices… and speaking of fabric…

Fat Quarter Shop is offering YOU and Modern Sewciety Listeners a discount!

Here is the discount code: LUCKY1316

It’s good for 13% off purchases, with a few exclusions like Flash Sales and Gift Certificates.

The coupons run through 7/13/16.


Picking Fabrics

Beginners Tip

So here we go!

I’m going shopping in my own stash to show you a tip on selecting fabric for your next quilt.

If you don’t know where to begin, start by finding a larger scale print that you’re attracted to. It should have at least 4 colors in it.  I fell in love with this large scale fabric and bought some for a future project… Isn’t it gorgeous?

DSC_0019I was originally attracted to the fun design and I also found the colors appealing.  It’s not a good fabric for piecing… but I bought it anyway!  I knew I’d use if for something… pillow covers, a quilt border, placemats, a quilt back… lot’s of other possibilities! Plus, it was on sale… no brainer!  So let’s see what happens when we pull the colors out of this fabric…

beginner guide ~ how to choose fabrics for your quilt

I picked out some solids to coordinate with the color palette. Don’t these solids look nice together?

DSC_0031 DSC_0032Or we can select coordinating prints…

how to choose fabrics for beginner quiltersIf you select coordinating prints, try to select some of varying scale – mix up some small prints and some medium prints.

choosing fabric for your first quilt

Also, try to find some that are stripes/geometric, some that are floral and some polka dots/spots.  They will magically blend together and add interest!

DSC_0061You can even blend the solids and the prints if you like!

Use the large print for your border or for the backing of your quilt!  I hope this helps some of you when you’re fabric shopping for your next quilt, even just a little bit!

I’m feeling inspired to make something now!  Don’t forget to tune into Stephanie at Modern Sewciety for some entertainment while you sew!

If you like this post, please pin and share it!

how to choose quilt fabric tips

sherri

UPDATE!
Look what I just saw on Mass Drop!  Denyse Schmidt bundle Katie Jump Rope.
(You can also find her bundles on Fat Quarter Shop)
Almost the same color palette!  Notice there are medium prints, small prints, geometric/stripes, dots, florals… 

Denyse Schmidt katie jump rope fabric

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Sewing Machine Cover

I finished my sewing machine cover just in the nick of time for the Nature Walk Fabric / Michael Miller challenge.

nature walk challengeIn my original post I thought I’d make a sewing machine cover… and I stuck to that plan since I really needed an excuse and a deadline to make one!  Which is ridiculous, I have to admit, since it didn’t take that long and my poor machine has been suffering for no reason!  (the horror!) Well not any more!

sewing machine cover tutorial

I purchased all my Nature Walk and charcoal Cotton Couture fabric from Fat Quarter Shop.  There are two equally gorgeous color stories to choose from,  by the very talented artist Tamara Kate…nature walk fabricSeriously… how do you choose?  I have to say, I was kicking myself for not ordering some of the daydream butterfly fabric!

nature walk fabric

The detail work in the abc panel is so fun and whimsical, I kept finding tiny drawings I hadn’t seen before as I was sewing… photo _6 - abc nature walk detail - tamara kate

I was thinking that if my girls were still little I would totally make valances with the ABC fabric – it’s adorable!  But back to the machine cover…

sewing-machine-cover-tutorial-3

While I was working on my cover I took some pics of how I put it together…  Here are some steps (you’ll have to do your own machine measurements):

Measure your machine and decide on size of cover.  I’m making my cover for my babylock BLQP.  My machine measured 8″ deep, 15″ tall (to top of thread cone) and 20″ wide.  I wanted my cover to be BIG ~ I don’t want to be fussing when I put the cover on, I want it to fit over easy and quick.  It goes together in three pieces, the body and the two sides…

Sandwich the body, batting and lining, then quilt.

sewing machine cover

To figure the length for the body of my cover I added the height x 2 + depth and added a couple inches to spare for roominess.

For the sides of my bag I used Pellon foam in the sandwich and it worked like a dream.  I quilted it with a couple straight line stitches, rounded the corners and then sewed 1/8″ around the edges to keep the edges in place.  If I didn’t plan to do a little hand stitching around my letters on the body I would have used the pellon foam for the body too – it helps your cover stand up quite nicely.

sewing machine cover

I bound the bottom edge of the two sides and the top and bottom edges of the body.  Since my corners were slightly rounded I made bias binding from the green ‘tall grass’ fabric.

sewing machine cover tutorial

I used wonder clips to hold it all in place for stitching.  These clips are so much better than pins!

sewing machine cover tutorialAfter the binding is stitched in place from the front, turn the binding to the side panels and hand stitch in place. See how nice it curves around the edge with the bias binding?

sewing machine cover tutorial

Done!  All snug and happy!

sewing machine cover tutorial

sherri

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Winter is Coming…

Winter IS Coming… And so are the holidays!
It’s inevitable so don’t shoot the messenger here… at least it’s not Christmas in July, I did wait till August! :)  I wanted to thank everyone for their nice emails and comments on my tutorials ~ it’s great to get feedback and hear from fellow quilters!
Earlier this summer I was busy working on this little holiday project for The Festival of Quilts. The festival is held in Birmingham, England, and I made this mini-quilt for the Warm Company’s booth to promote their fusible fleece.

applique christmas tree free mini quilt pattern

All the applique is either quilting cotton or wool…
mini quilt pattern ~ Christmas treeI used perle cotton to backstitch or add bullion knots around all the applique.
holiday applique mini quilt and I also used the perle cotton to do some big stitch hand quilting… ( Hand Quilting Tutorial is Here ) if you look close you can see that I followed the circular lines on the white fabric which made it super easy…
big stitch hand quilting with perle cotton mini quilt
mini christmas quilt with big stitch hand quiltingThis project was available at the show this past weekend to UK retailers for their shops as a free pattern sheet… and if you like this pattern (and I hope you do!) I’m posting it here for you too! ~ download free and enjoy!

WARM WISHES MINI QUILT DOWNLOAD 

Check out my new Scandinavian Quilt Pattern HERE!

Scandinavian Tomte, Christmas quilt pattern

 Please Pin and Share!
christmas mini quilt patternPS ~ I AM a huge Game of Thrones fan!  Winter IS Coming!!!  Yippee!

sherri

MORE HOLIDAY PROJECTS & TUTORIALS:

Christmas Quilt Pattern Scandinavian Tomte

Christmas Quilt Pattern ~ Scandinavian Tomte

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Winter is Coming…

Winter IS Coming... And so are the holidays! It's inevitable so don't shoot the messenger here... at least it's not ...
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Trip around the Tree Skirt

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Countdown to Christmas ~ Hip Holiday Houses

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Linking Up:
Sew Fresh Quilts, My Quilt Infatuation, Quilt Story, She Can Quilt, Blossom Heart Quilts, Quilt Shop Gal, Crazy Mom Quilts,
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Bento Bag ~ A Lunch bag Tutorial

Sew Mama Sew and Spoonflower put together a fabulous

Kitchen Linens Challenge!

The challenge was to choose a kitchen fabric from Spoonflower and make anything kitchen related… I made this fun Bento Bag!

Bento Bag ~ a lunch and snack bag tutorialI think selecting the fabrics was almost harder than making the bag!  I was deep into the fabric ‘rabbit hole’ at Spoonflower, but I couldn’t get my eyes off this Equilibrium from Scrummy’s food and drink collection!  And I’m sure you can see why!  Am I right?

equilibrium fabric by scrummy on spoonflower

I chose a coordinating fabric called Springtime Gold Spot, also by Scrummy to coordinate!

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Both fabrics are in Spoonflowers Linen Cotton Canvas.  If you are not familiar with Spoonflower, you choose your fabric design (or design your own!) and then you choose what type of fabric to print it on!  You can get Kona Cotton, Minky, Knit, Satin, Canvas and more!  If you are a quilter check out my Quilt Labels with Spoonflower Tutorial and design your own quilt labels!

Want to make this Bento Bag?

Bento bag - lunch and snack bag sewing tutorial

General Notes:

  • Always sew 1/2″ seam unless otherwise noted.
  • Backstitch at all start and stops.

Here is what you need…

Materials

  • 3/4 yard equilibrium cotton canvas fabric
  • 1/2 yard springtime gold spot cotton canvas fabric
  • (2) 14″ x 12″ pieces of insul-bright
  • 1/2 yard of ripstop nylon for lining
  • 7″ separating zipper
  • steam a seam 1/4″ tape
  • 15″ nylon strap for handle
  • optional fusible interfacing

To get started, from the equilibrium fabric cut:

  • two 10″ x 12″ for the bag exterior
  • two 2 1/4 x 5″ for the side pocket binding
  • four 3″ x 10″ pieces for the top zipper flaps

bento bag - lunch and snack bag sewing tutorial

Optional: For a more structured bag, back both of the 10″ x 12″ pieces with fusible interfacing cut to 9 1/2″ x 11 1/2″.  Center and fuse in place.

bento bag - lunch and snack bag tutorialFrom the Springtime Gold Spot fabric, cut:

  • two 5″ x 9 1/2″ for the bag sides
  • two 5″ x 6″ for the side pockets

    Bento Box ~ lunch and snack bag sewing tutorial

Optional: For a more structured bag, back both of the 5″ x 9 1/2″ pieces with fusible interfacing cut to 4 1/2″ x 9″.  Center and fuse in place.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Now sew the 2 1/4″ x 5″ binding strips to the top of the 5″ x 6″ pocket pieces.  Matching at 5″ sides and sewing a 1/2″ seam.  Press seam open.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Turn raw edge under two times to the back of the pocket piece and covering stitching. Press and pin in place.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorialBento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Turn to the front of the pocket piece and topstitch along edge of binding, catching the fold of the binding on the back side.  I topstitched twice and used this Aurifil 12 weight thread for topstitching to make it stand out and to be a little more decorative.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorialNext, place your pockets on top of the side exterior pieces ~ align at the bottom edges and baste in place with 1/4″ seam.  Align side units with the top edge of the equilibrium exterior piece and join with 1/2″ seam.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Press open.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial Join second exterior piece, aligning at the top edge again…

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

After sides are attached align bottom edges of exterior pieces and sew 1/2″ seam.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Now, box the bottom corners and sew 1/2″ seam across edge.

Bento Bag - lunch bag and snack bag tutorial

Turn your exterior bag right side out and set aside.  Let’s work on the top zipper now…  We will be using the four 3″ x 10″  exterior pieces (two for each zipper half) and the steam a seam for these steps.  Center the zipper, right side down, with the raw edge aligned with the 10″ edge of the fabric.  Use steam a seam or pins to secure zipper bottom and top fabrics.

bento bag - a lunch bag tutorial

Layer second fabric carefully on top (right side down) and pin or iron to secure.  Sew 1/2″ on each short end and sew along zipper (with zipper foot) on long edge.

lunch bag sewing tutorial

Repeat for second zipper side.  Clip corners and turn both pieces right side out.  Top stitch around three sides.

Bento Bag - A lunch bag sewing tutorialZip parts together, center zipper and cut to 5″ width.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Unzip and pin one zipper part, right side together with each side of bag.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorialPin handle ends in place right sides together with bag.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorialSet aside bag exterior while we work on the lining… Cut two 12″ x 14″  lining pieces from your nylon ripstop fabric and two from the Insul-bright.  Layer and cut two 2 1/2″ corners out along the bottom 14″ edge.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Now place the two ripstop pieces right sides together, sandwiched in between two pieces of Insul-bright.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Sew along two sides and a couple inches along the bottom edge at each corner.  Leave the corners open and the center of the bottom open (for turning bag later). Trim away excess Insul-bright in the seam to reduce bulk.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Box two corners and sew with 1/2″ seam.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Keep lining wrong side out and place your exterior bag inside the lining.  This step is a bit tricky with the bulk and the handle inside but just go slow and match up sides at center points and pin well.  Sew around top edge with 1/2″ seam.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Turn bag right side out and sew lining opening shut.

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Enjoy your new Bento Lunch Bag!

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

Plenty of room inside to pack a good lunch!
Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial

If you like this post… Please share it!

Bento Bag - a lunch bag sewing tutorial from rebeccamaedesigns

Thank You Sew Mama Sew and Spoonflower for offering this challenge!

Check out the participants!

Michelle from Falafel and the Bee
Alicia from Two Kids and a Blog
Mary from See Mary Quilt
Trina from Will Cook for Shoes
Daisy from Ants to Sugar

sherri

See More Tutorials ~

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Flat Iron Case ~ Tutorial

Travel Case for Flat / Curling Iron ~

a Sewing Tutorial

travel case tutorial

I’m in love… with all this pink!

This case isn’t just pretty…   It’s insulated with Insul-Bright and perfect for packing a hot iron!

I teamed up with The Warm Company to bring you a tutorial and Give-Away!

Here are the supplies you need to make this case:

Body ~ exterior fabric  12” x 18”
Body ~ lining fabric  12” x 18”
Insul-Bright for body ~  12” x 18”
Pocket fabric ~ 12″ x 11 1/2”
Pocket lining fabric ~ 12″ x 11 1/2”
Insul-Bright for pocket ~ 12″ x 11 1/2”
Binding ~  aprox 2 yards
Ribbon ~  40”
Velcro Dots ~  2 sets

You can find the complete tutorial below but here are a couple tips on quilting the case and binding the pocket…

QUILTING

I started with Insul-Bright so the case would be insulated.  If you’re not familiar with this product you can use it to insulate anything ~ hot or cold! I use it in my Lunch Bag Tutorial AND my Potholder / Towel tutorial)

flat iron case sewing tutorial

I layered the bag parts (Insul-Bright / fabric) following the tutorial and marked them for quilting using this hera marker I found on amazon.  I used my ruler and marker to make marks at 1″ intervals to keep my stitching lines straight..

sewing tutorial flat iron case

 You can see the marks here…

hera marker tutorial

After all my lines were marked, I just stitched right on them!

BINDING

After my quilting was done I got my binding strip aligned on the top edge.  I lined up the raw edge of the binding with the raw edge of the pocket and stitched the binding on with 1/4″ seam.

flat iron case sewing tutorial

Then I flipped the fold edge to the back of the pocket, top stitched along the binding catching the back (fold) of the binding on the lining side!  Easy!

flat iron case sewing tutorialPlace your quilted layers together and bind around all the edges, add your velcro… Done and Done!

flat iron travel case sewing tutorial

 Find out more about Insul-Bright here.

flat iron case travel sewing tutorialWant to make one too? You can!

sewing tutorial flat iron case

Please pin this tutorial and share!

PRINTABLE PDF is below…

Free Sewing Tutorial for a flat iron or curling iron case.

Here is the Flat Iron Case PDF.

If you are new to my site, find more free tutorials on my

TUTORIALS PAGE.

And don’t forget to visit my shop for patterns, fun sewing machine clocks, quilt-a-longs, mitten patterns and more!

 

The Warm Company is giving away

FIVE PACKAGES of Insul-Bright!!! (US residents)

To enter:

 Like The Warm Company on FB

and/or

Pin this post on Pinterest!

 Comment that you did! Easy!

I’ll pick and post the winners on Sunday 4/26/15!
Sorry this Drawing is closed but Please Pin and Share this tutorial!

 

sherri

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Quilt as you go Tutorial ~ Part 3

TUTORIAL ~ quilt as you go method of joining blocks

If you are following the Quilt~as~you~Go method this post covers joining the blocks into rows.  We will:

1 Cut the fabric sashing strips for joining blocks.
2 Join the blocks and spacers into rows using the qaug method.

Need the pattern?  Find it here:

Power of Nine Quilt Pattern 

You can find the instructions on completing a quilted block (part 1) or a spacer (part 2)with the qaug method in previous posts.

Materials you will need:

  • quilted blocks ~ full blocks and spacer blocks
  • sashing fabric ~ cut into strips (see below)
  • quilters ruler
  • hera marker (like this one)

Quilt as You Go ~ Notes:

A walking foot for your machine is highly recommended.
This method will require additional fabric for attaching the blocks ~ (see previous post).

Remember this quilt diagram below?  Notice the dark grey ‘sashing’ between all the blocks and spacers of the quilt top.  This narrow sashing (for joining) is what I will be covering in this post.

quilt as you go sashing tutorial

If you’re following along, you should have all your blocks(3) and spacers(4) for the top row complete.

quilt as you go tutorial

Lay out your blocks in order on a large surface or design wall.  Check the front and back sides of your blocks if you have any directional prints to be sure that they are positioned properly ~

quilt as you go tutorial joining blocks

The fabric on the back of my blocks has raccoons, I don’t want the racoons upside down or sideways, so I need to be aware of this as I’m joining my blocks.

quilt as you go tutorial joining blocks

Here is what you’ll need for Each Row ~

Six 12 1/2″ x 1″ sashing strips that coordinate with the front of your quilt.

Six 12 1/2″ x 1″ sashing strips that coordinate with the back of your quilt.

quilt as you go tutorial joining blocks

Lets start by connecting the first spacer block and the first quilt block on the top row (see next pic).

Select one sashing strip for the front of the quilt plus one sashing strip for the back…

quilt as you go tutorial joining blocks

Place your quilted spacer block with the front side facing up.  Sandwich it between the two sashing strips along the right long edge.  The front sashing strip on top and the back sashing strip on the bottom.  Each sashing strip should be right sides together with the spacer block…

how to joing blocks using quilt as you go method

Stitch in place with a 1/4″ seam.

how to joing quilt blocks with quilt as you go method

Press only the top sashing strip open to the right.  Layer the quilt block on top with the front side down (front sides together).  Align the right side of the block with the edge of the top sashing strip.

how to join quilted blocks using quilt as you go method

Sew together on right edge using 1/4″ seam.  This is what it should look like after it’s joined…

join quilt blocks with quilt as you go method

Now flip it open, the front side is done! It’s a beautiful thing! SEW EASY!

how to join quilt blocks with quilt as you go method

 Let’s take a look at the back now…how to join blocks quilt as you go methodAlign the 1/2″ mark on your quilters ruler with the stitching on your sashing piece.  Use your hera marker to mark along the edge of your ruler.

quilt as you go tutorial on joining blocks

Now you will have a nice crease mark on your sashing strip.

joining blocks quilt as you go

The crease makes it nice and easy to turn under the sashing strip for a clean line… Pin and press turned strip.

joining quilted blocks quilt as you go

After pressing I basted the turned strip in place ~ I don’t like having pins in my way so this works perfect for me.  I used this Roxanne basting glue and dotted along the seam allowance.

how to join quilt blocks

And then I just finger pressed the strip in place.quilt as you go joining blocks

It’s ready to stitch in place!  I hand stitched mine, but you could machine stitch also.  The glue bastes quick (no waiting for it to dry) and washes out so there’s no worry about it leaving a residue or stiffness.

 

Ready for the next spacer block?  Join in the same method except this time your block will be sandwiched between two strips and your spacer block will be on top… joining quilt blocksquilt as you go tutorialLooking good!

quilt-as-you-go-3-169

Continue until the row is complete!quilt as you go tutorial

Quilt as you go joining blocks tutorial.

Dreamy!!!quilt as you go tutorial

That’s all there is to it!  What do you think???  I hope you love this method as much as I do!

You can try the ALTERNATE METHOD that I use when joining the rows for joining the blocks as well.  It uses a fraction more fabric but you could easily use this method for joining the blocks as well… might even be a bit easier, and I think it’s become my new go to method!

The next QAUG post in this series will be on quilting the long spacer rows.

If you like this post
Please share it!

 How to join quilt blocks using the quilt as you go method.

ALL The Quilt-as-You-Go RELATED POSTS: 

sherri

You can find ALL the related posts below…

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Trip around the Tree Skirt

I have this new little pencil tree tucked in a corner and I thought… wouldn’t it be fun to make a

Trip Around the World Tree Skirt!

 

It was actually my nephew Sammy that brought it up…

tree skirt tutorial

Imagine my embarrassment!  He was right… smart puppy!

My tree skirt is made from four of these 12″ scrappy trip around the world quilt blocks.

trip around the world quilt block tutorialThis was the perfect size for my ‘pencil’ tree, but if you want to make a larger skirt read on…

I used this yummy In from the Cold fabric by Kate Spain!

tree skirt 127 logo I’m making mine scrappy.  Want to make one too?

Let’s get started!

Cut yourself six fabric strips 2 1/2″ x 16″ ~ I used fat quarters so mine were a little longer @ 18″ (but that’s ok)… cutting accuracy is key so make some good 2 1/2″ cuts here!

tree skirt 129 logo

Sew the strips together using 1/4″ seam… slow and steady so your strips are nice and straight… You’ll thank yourself later!

This magnetic seam guide (below) helps me keep things straight when sewing long strips.  The magnet sticks to the plate on my machine bed :) and I can position it based on my seam allowance.  Handy!  If you can’t find one in your quilt shop look here on amazon.

tree skirt tutorial

 Press seams in opposite directions… press from front as well, to be sure there are no folds at your seams…

trip around the world quilt tree skirt tutorial

trip around the world quilt block tutorial

Your strip set should measure 12 1/2″ wide if your 1/4″ seams are accurate.

trip around the world quilt block tutorial

Cut yourself a straight edge at the end of your strip set… notice how I have the horizontal lines on my ruler lined up with the seams on my pieced set?  This is important to get a squared up edge cut.

trip around the world quilt block tutorialFold strip set in half and sew the two long end strips together to make a tube… (the right edge in next picture)

tree skirt 137 logo

Next, cut six 2 1/2″ units from your ‘tube’…

tree skirt tutorial

Now you should have six little tube units…trip around the tree skirt tutorial

Since I wanted the red fabric to be the center on the diagonal, I used my seam ripper to open up the seam right above the red block…

trip around the world quilt block tutorial

For each tube, open the next seam above… sounds easy enough, but it can get confusing so double check before you pick that seam open.  Lay them out as you open them up to check that you’re diagonal fabrics all line up…

tree skirt 102 logoNow, turn each strip over and press the new seam (from making tube) in the proper (opposite) direction.

Sew strips together, nesting and pinning @ seams ~

trip around the world quilt block tutorial

Be careful to keep strips in order while sewing.  Double check before you sew it.

When you finish sewing those strip units together, your first block is done! Look over your block and be sure that all your fabrics line up on the diagonal and you didn’t turn any of your strips while sewing…trip around the world quilt block tutorial

For the little tree skirt (24″ x 24″) make four 12″ blocks…trip around the world block tutorial

This is how I quilted my tree skirt… (read my quilt sandwich tute here)

First sew your four completed blocks together, and layer:

1) tree skirt backing, right side down

2) batting

3) top (four block unit), right side up trip around the world quilt tree skirt tutorial

I spray basted mine together

tree skirt tutorial

and quilted on the diagonal in both directions using my walking foot.

trip around the world quilt block tutorial

Then I trimmed off the corners, cut a slit from the center to one side (right down seam) and added a circle cut out in the middle (I just traced a large jar for circle).

christmas tree skirt tutorialAll that’s left is the binding.  You will need bias binding due to the circle.  I cheated and cut one small strip of bias binding to do the circle and then I attached it to straight grain binding to do the rest… mainly because I had some of the straight grain binding left over from another Christmas project.

If you need a refresher on how to make bias binding  or how to attach binding, check out my tutorials.  On the tree skirt you can tackle these obtuse angled corners the same as a 90 degree corner.   Stop 1/4″ before edge, fold the binding to the right and line up with edge…trip around the world quilt block tutorial Then flip back to the left, pin and sew starting at edge. tree skirt tutorial

That’s all there is to it!  Fits perfect!quilted tree skirt tutorial

 

If you want to make a larger tree skirt make four larger trip around the world blocks.  Here are the measurements, read the column down for each size.

24″ tree skirt
(like mine)
42″ tree skirt
48″ tree skirt
Cut six 2 1/2″ x 16″
strips
Cut six 4″ x 25″
strips
Cut six 4 1/2″ x 28″
strips
Cut tubes into 2 1/2″
units
Cut tubes into 4″
units
Cut tubes into 4 1/2″
units
Makes one 12″ block
Makes one 21″ block
Makes one 24″ block
Make 4 blocks
Make 4 blocks
Make 4 blocks

IF YOU LIKE THIS YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE MY NEW

SCANDINAVIAN TOMTE PATTERN!

Scandinavian Tomte quilt pattern
sherri

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Make Quilt Labels with Spoonflower

Recently I decided to try something new and print my own custom fabric labels using spoonflower.com.  I made some basic labels in four colors…

spoonflower quilt labels

You can write with a permanent fabric marker if you want to include your name/date/quilt title etc.

spoonflower quilt labels

I uploaded a simple design of four labels (one in each color) that I created in Adobe Illustrator.  When you upload to the spoonflower site, the pattern is automatically repeated.  Each label is 4.5″W x 3.5″H.  I ordered a fat quarter, printed on kona cotton, which gave me 24 labels in various colors.

spoonflower quilt labels

spoonflower quilt labelsThen I just cut them with my rotary cutter…

spoonflower quilt labels

If you like my iQuilt design you can order it yourself direct from spoonflower.com.    Since every order is custom printed expect to wait for your order.  I believe it took three weeks to receive my order, and you can view the order status right on the site.  So give yourself some time if you want to create some labels (or other fabric) and need your order by specific date.

You can go on their site and order yourself some design tools including a swatch kit for $1 and other tools like a color card and color map.

spoonflower quilt labels

The fabric swatch book includes a sample of each fabric which is handy when deciding what weight or type of fabric to print your design on. 

spoonflower quilt labels

I tried printing some with my name on them too… This time I printed on the Basic Combed Cotton.  It’s a bit stiffer than the Kona Cotton, but for labels it’s a bit easier to write on.

Here is one version with my name that I put on my Sampler Quilt…

spoonflower quilt labels

Another simple design with my name already printed.  I pieced this into a small block with scraps from the quilt top.

spoonflower quilt labels

I like to quilt the outline of the large letters with some perle cotton ~ like the Q for Quilt and here the S…

spoonflower quilt labels

It’s really fun to get your own custom labels printed ~ even if they are simple like mine.  Spoonflower has a great tutorial for creating your own design if your a little computer savy.  

Or you can check out the other quilt labels that have already been designed including my iQuilt design.

This wraps up Finishing your Quilt Sampler…

Complete the block patterns

Assemble/Sew blocks using block layout

Add a quilt border

How to make a quilt sandwich

Hand quilting tutorial √ 

Making bias binding

 Attaching the binding 

And finishing with a label 

If you like this post,
Please share it…

Tutorial ~ How to make quilt labels with Spoonflower

sherri

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Finishing ~ How to Bind a Quilt

If you are ready to attach your binding then you should have your quilt sandwich all quilted.  If you need to make binding, check out the tutorial on making bias binding.

For this demo I’ll be binding my quilt block from the quilt sandwich tutorial so it’s easier to photograph.

Optional ~ before trimming the batting / backing and squaring up the quilt top I like to topstitch using a 1/8″ seam around the perimeter of the quilt top.  This extra step holds everything together for the binding.  Use a walking foot to evenly move the three layers through the machine.

DSC_0006 600x logo

Trim away the excess batting and backing layers. (don’t sweat it if you trim into your top stitched edge a bit)

Lay prepared binding along edge of quilt top (raw edges together).

how to bind a quilt

Note ~ A 1/4″ seam allowance is most common but I will be using a 1/2″ seam allowance in this tutorial.  Read making binding for more info on seam allowances.

Leave a 10″ tail when you begin to allow for joining when you finish sewing around perimeter. 

how to bind a quilt

Begin sewing (backstitch to secure) and stop 1/4″ from edge of quilt top. Backstitch at stop.

how to bind a quilt

Fold binding to the right, finger press fold and place a pin to secure.  It is important that your edges align.  If your binding rests higher, you didn’t sew far enough, and if it rests lower, you stitched too far.  Adjust now to avoid wonky corners later. 

how to bind a quilt

Fold binding to left and align with raw edge of quilt top.  Make sure fold on right edge is aligned with side of quilt top.

how to bind a quilt

Turn your quilt and begin sewing at the edge.  Remember to backstitch to secure.  Repeat this process for each corner.

quilt binding tutorial

When you come to the end leave yourself some room to work the two ends together ~ I usually shoot for an aprox 12″ gap.  You should have two tail ends now.

In the next picture I’m back to the start.  You will notice my starting tail is on the left and ending tail is on the right. 

My binding strip is 3.25″ wide when unfolded.  I’m measuring that same measurement ( 3.25″) from the edge of my starting tail and I’ve placed a pin there to mark it. (note: if you have a 2.5″ binding, measure in 2.5″ and so forth)

how to bind a quilt

Overlap the starting tail with the end tail from the right and mark a cutting/trim line from where the pin is.

quilt binding tutorial

Trim end tail on line. (do NOT cut through starting tail!!!)

quilt binding tutorial

Gather your quilt top and clip or pin in place to give yourself some freedom to work the two ends together without tugging.

Note ~ I’m using these  wonder clips that are fantastic!  Get yourself some, they are well worth the money!

how to bind a quilt
Without twisting,  place your two ends right sides together in an “L” shape.  Mark outside corner to outside corner and stitch together.
how to bind a quilt

Trim excess leaving 1/4″ below stitch line.

quilt binding tutorial

Remove clip holding quilt top and press binding seam open.

quilt binding tutorial

Binding should lay flat and fit perfect.  Notice diagonal seam distributes bulk nicely.  Finish stitching down binding. 

how to bind a quilt

Fold binding to back of quilt and notice the corners miter without fussing. 

quilt binding tutorial

The binding should extend to back of quilt and cover stitches nicely.  I’m using those fabulous wonder clips again…

how to bind a quilt

When I adjust the mitered corners on the backside of my quilt I face the little slit ‘opening’ in the opposite direction, which distributes any bulk more evenly.  In this next picture the ‘opening’ on the top side faces me.

how to bind a quilt

And here in the next picture the ‘opening’ on the back faces away.  Make sense?  ok :)

how to bind a quilt

Rather than clip the binding in place around the entire perimeter I usually just use a few clips to hold my binding in place to get going and then I move them ahead of my stitching as I go. 

I’m going to hand stitch the binding to the back. 

Choose a thread that matches your binding.  (mine is dark so you can see my stitches)

I’m using the knotless start method… 

Cut a length of thread.  Fold it in half and feed the loop through your needle.

knotless start sewing

Slide needle to other end.

knotless start sewing

Begin sewing your binding to the back along any side you choose.  Insert your needle right next to the binding and into the backing and batting only (not through quilt top) and then on your way up pick up the edge of the binding.

how to bind a quilt

Pull thread through until loop is close.  Feed needle (and thread) through loop.

how to bind a quilt
Pull tight to secure.

how to bind a quilt

Insert needle (into quilt back and batting only) right next to where thread comes out of binding.  Bring needle out aprox 1/4″ away, just catching the edge of the binding.

how to bind a quilt

Continue this same stitch all the way around the perimeter until your finished!  Admire your hand work!
how to bind a quilt

Admire your binding from the front too!

DSC_0136 600x400

And THAT is how you bind your quilt! :)

If you are binding around curved edges you start and end with the same method but you will simply curve your bias binding around the corners, pin in place, and stitch away.   DSC_0155 600x400

Piece of cake!

sherri

Craftsy

If you want to see more of this quilt, here are all the

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Finishing ~ How to make Bias Binding

Want to learn how to make Bias Binding for your quilt?

You might need to grab a cup of tea or coffee for this post.  It involves math… need I say more?

You may call me crazy but the binding is really a favorite part of the quilt making process for me… It’s the home stretch after all, and you get to see everything come together… I just love it!!!  And I want you to love it too! 

Although bias binding is stronger (wears better) than straight grain binding, you really only need to use bias binding if your quilt (or other project) has curved edges.   Bias binding strips are cut on the 45 degree angle of the fabric, and therefore stretch easily around curves. There are several methods of making bias binding and I’m going to show you how I make it.  I typically purchase my binding fabric right off the bolt so I like to calculate how much I will need based on a yardage cut rather than a square cut of fabric as some tutorials demonstrate.   We will assume that your standard off the bolt fabric is aprox 42″ wide with selvages removed. So, let’s get started…

how to make bias binding

bias binding ~ 1/2″ seam allowance

I’m using my Sampler quilt as the ‘math’ demo, and since it has rounded corners I needed to make bias binding.  You will need to know your quilt top dimensions and the desired width of your binding strips before you begin.

BINDING WIDTH The key to how wide to cut your binding strips is in your desired binding width or binding seam allowance.    The following chart helps to demonstrate what strip width to cut based on the binding seam allowance you are using.  When piecing your quilt top the standard seam allowance is 1/4″, therefore if your pattern extends to the edge of the quilt or you have points on the edge (no border) then you may need to go with a 1/4″ binding seam.  This ensures that your finished results (quilt top) will be correct (and you won’t sew into your points).  Still with me? Here is a chart showing typical seam allowances and possible strip widths:

Seam allowance

Cut binding strip width to:

¼”

2”, 2 ¼” or  2 ½”

3/8”

2 ¼” or 2 ½”

½”

2 ½”, 3” or 3 ¼”

You might be wondering… Why the variations in widths? If your using a low loft batting and quilting cotton (like my example) then you will go with a narrower width.  But if you are using a high loft batting and perhaps flannel or a heavier weight fabric then go with a wider width strip even though you are using the same seam allowance.  This will give you a little extra binding to accommodate the thickness of your quilt. 

Another thing to think about (as if that wasn’t enough) is if you like your binding tight, so when you fold it over to the back side it just covers your stitches or maybe you like it a little looser so it extends beyond your back stitches more.  If you’re a beginner, go with a wider binding that corresponds to your desired seam allowance, it might be the easiest option.  All these things factor into your width choice. Make sense? 

bias binding math

BINDING MATH:

example: 

Math for a 60″ x 74″ quilt top. 

I want to use a 1/2″ seam allowance

My batting is low loft but I have lots of seams along the edge of my quilt top so I’m going a little wider than usual to accommodate a little more bulk ~  3 1/4″ binding strips.

math:

60 + 60 + 74 + 74 = 268″  perimeter

add 12″ extra (for piecing the strips, corners, finishing etc) = 280″ adjusted perimeter#

Now divide 280″ by 42 (useable width of fabric) = 6.6 and round this number up to 7 (next whole number)

Multiply 7 x the 3.25 (width of binding strips) = 22.75″

I WILL NEED 22.75″ OF FABRIC OFF THE BOLT FOR MY BINDING!

DONE! 

Does your head hurt now? I don’t want your head to hurt, so to make this easier, print off this EASY binding yardage worksheet to figure it out ~ just write in your numbers!   :)

Phew! Ok, so how do you cut your bias strips? I’m starting with my 22.75 width of fabric off the bolt and first I like to cut my selvages off ~ and I always cut 1″ off my selvage edge.

how to make bias binding

As a side note I save all my selvages for a future project… so throw them in a vase or other fun container in your sewing space… you never know when you may want to make a fun selvage project…

how to make bias binding

Now that your fabric selvages are trimmed off, open your fabric up.

how to make bias binding

fabric is right side down

Fold down top left corner to meet bottom edge.

how to make bias bindingPlace your ruler along the fold edge and cut the edge of the fold off.

how to make bias binding

trim aprox 1/8″ from fold edge

Remove the cut triangle without turning.

how to make bias binding

cut piece is right side up

Important ~ rotate the cut triangle counter clockwise so the bottom edge of the triangle (shown in picture above) is now the right edge of the triangle (see picture below).  Move the rotated triangle over to the right.

place RSD piece on top of RSU piece (now right sides together)and align right edges

place RSD piece on top of RSU piece (now right sides together)and align right edges

Slide the triangle under the larger cut of fabric so they are right sides together and align the right side edges.  Pin and sew the right edge.

triangle on bottom RST with right edges aligned

triangle on bottom RST with right edges aligned ~ sew right edge

Open seamed unit and you should have a parallelogram.  Press seam open.

how to make bias binding

seam and press open

Bias strips will now be cut along bias (45 degree) edge. 

how to make bias bindingIf your ruler isn’t long enough to cover length of the bias edge, you can move it as you cut or you can fold your fabric keeping the bias edge aligned.

how to make bias bindingPlace your ruler along the bias edge and cut your desired strip width ~ for the example I’m cutting 3.25″ strips.

how to make bias binding

cut strips on bias edge

The ends of your strips will be ready to piece together to form your continuous bias binding.

how to make bias binding

Place two ends right sides together ~ notice ends are offset slightly ~ sew 1/4″ seam.

how to make bias binding

Press the seam open and trim off ‘dog ears’.

how to make bias binding

Note: If you are piecing together straight grain binding or bias binding with a straight end on your strip,  overlap your ends an sew on a diagonal from outside edge to outside edge.  Trim excess and press seam open

how to make bias binding

Sew all strips together and press all seams open. Take this long piece to the ironing board, fold and press in half on the length to finish making your binding.  I like to use best press, which is a starch alternative, to make my binding nice and crisp.  I’m addicted to the Caribbean Beach scent, but it also comes in other scents or scent free.

how to make bias binding

Now Your DONE with making your bias binding!!!

sherri
Craftsy

If you want to see more of this quilt, here are all the

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Finishing ~ Hand Quilting

We all have our favorite part of putting together a quilt.  For some it’s the piecing, or maybe you love the binding (I do!) or perhaps it’s the quilting?  Free motion quilting is definitely fun but if you don’t have all the right equipment, getting a large quilt through a domestic machine can be daunting! 

When I was deciding on how to quilt my sampler I changed my mind more than once (shocker!) I debated, and thought, and finally decided to hand quilt.  After all, I had the time… (right?) 

how to hand quilt

I have hand quilted smaller projects but this was my first large hand quilting project.  I loved the freedom of being able to quilt one block at a time.  It was fun to finish one block and then move to the next one and decide on how to quilt just that block.  I could multi task, watch Netflix (who got me hooked on fringe and mad men?) and quilt at the same time!  And I don’t think I used my seam ripper once!  BONUS!

Spooky thought it was a good idea too… she’s such a big help…

hand quilting tutorial

I used DMC Perle Cotton #8  for my quilting~ SO YUMMY!  It comes in tons of colors, is easy to work with and shows off your hard work with it’s pretty shine.

hand quilting with perle cotton

Here are the colors I used:

purple 554, blue 519, yellow 725, green 3348, ecru, orange 947

I have this great DMC Color chart for choosing colors!

hand-quilting

If you’re looking for a color chart you can also download this DMC Thread Color Card PDF or purchase a DMC Thread Printed Color Card.

hand-quilting with perle cotton

Gather your Supplies:

Here are some general supplies you’ll want before you get started.

Quilters Hoop ~ I’m using a 14″  Dritz 14-Inch Quilting No-Slip Hoop  

Thimble ~ I use this one  Clover Metal Open-Sided Thimble

Perle Cotton #8

Scissors ~ small pair

Needle ~ recommendations from DMC here

Needle Threader ~ optional but I couldn’t have done without one

Painters Tape ~ for help keeping stitches straight

Basted Quilt Sandwich

This is the type of needle threader I used.  It has a hook on each end that slides through needle eye to grab the floss and pull through.  Made threading SO much easier!  This needle threader from DMC would also work.  You’ll just need to be sure your needle eye can accommodate the hook.

hand quilting tutorial

Getting Started:

It’s best to work from the quilt center out toward the edges, so position your hoop closest to the center of your quilt and secure.  I started my quilting on the center block of my quilt and worked my way around and out to the sides.  It worked out beautifully.  It’s a little more cumbersome when you’re working in the middle of the quilt, since there’s more quilt to wrap your arms around, but just adjust everything until you’ve got a comfortable set up.

Cut yourself a piece of perle cotton no longer than 30″ (manageable length).  Any longer and it will be awkward to work with and it will get fuzzy when you pull it through the quilt sandwich too many times.

Thread your needle and tie a simple overhand knot in the end of the cotton.

hand quilt tutorial

Start by inserting the needle aprox 1/2 inch from where you wish to begin quilting.  Push your needle through the top and batting only and travel through quilt.  Bring your needle up at your starting point. 

hand quilt with perle cotton

Pull the thread until the knot reaches the quilt top and give it a sharp tug ~ it will pop through the quilt top and embed itself in the batting.  You will get the hang of this after a few tries.

how to hand quilt

Let’s get quilting.  I quilt toward myself at a slight diagonal, (rather than right to left) and I find it the easiest way for me.  Do what feels comfortable for you.  Start a stitch with the needle sticking straight down through the quilt.  I’m right handed and I have my right hand on top of the quilt making the stitch, and my left hand guiding the needle on the back of my quilt.  In the next picture my left hand is under the quilt sandwich and the needle is just poking through the other side resting on my finger tip.  (yes, this finger tip will get a little sore… occupational hazzard)

big stitch quilting tutorial

When I feel the point of the needle come through the back of the quilt with my finger tip, I tilt the needle backward away from me.   Now, push that back finger up, creating a small bump on the quilt top where your needle is.  With your right hand thumb, push down on the quilt top in front of the needle, making the bump more defined, and now you can push the needle through that bump. 

hand quilting big stitch tutorialReview steps:

  • needle straight up and down just through quilt sandwich touching left hand finger tip

  • tilt needle back

  • push up with left finger from under quilt

  • push down with right thumb in front of needle to make the defined bump

  • push needle through bump

big stitch hand quilting

Your thimble may feel unnatural on your finger, and you may struggle through the first several stitches but it will quickly get easier.  Stick with it!  Your left finger tips will get sore and there are some products you can use like another thimble or little ‘dots’ to stick on your finger to protect it but I couldn’t get the same results using anything on those left hand fingers.  I needed to be able to feel the needle.

big stitch quilting

When you are ready for another length of perle cotton or done your quilting, you will need to tie off and embed the end in the batting.  Start by tying another overhand knot in the end of your perle cotton. 

hand quilt with perle cotton

Pull the end of the perle cotton, sliding the knot down near the quilt top. 

hand quilting with perle cotton

Knot should be right at the top of the quilt.

hand quilting with perle cotton

Insert needle back into hole that the perle cotton is coming out of and travel through the batting only, then back out of top about a 1/2″ away. 

hand quilting tutorial

Pull needle through and give perle cotton a tug to embed knot in batting and carefully snip off the tail.

big stitch hand quilting tutorial

If you are quilting a long straight line and need a ‘guide’ try using painters tape and just stitch along side of it!  It helps and the tape pulls right off and you can use it a couple more times before the ‘stick’ is worn out.  big stitch hand quilting tutorial

That’s it!  If your new to hand quilting start on small projects like I did, then when your comfortable, move your way up to a large project…

Sampler Quilt – details and quilted blocks

Find the Scrap Happy Sampler Quilt pattern

 in My Shop AND on Craftsy.

sampler block of the month

I also hand quilted Modern Love if you want to go check out that quilt… And Warm Wishes is also hand quilted and includes a pdf pattern download.

I have a

Hand Quilting Bundle available in my shop

if you want to give it a go!  

Pearl Cotton Hand Quilting Bundle

I found these video tutorials very helpful:

This is another EXCELLENT free video tutorial if you want to get into hand quilting feathers:    how to hand quilt feathers video tutorial

If you are hard core into quilting ~ this looks FUN!   hand quilting motifs video tutorial

hand quilting tutorial

If you like this post

Please share it…

how to hand quilt with perle cotton

sherri

Craftsy

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Finishing ~ Scrappy Quilt Border

If you have your quilt top layout finished and your looking for ideas for the border here is how I pieced mine… I made the border for my sampler quilt using a wedge ruler.  I absolutely love how this border came out, but I want to caution you that there will be some ‘left over’ wedges when you use this tutorial so please read through this post before deciding if this method is right for you.

scrap happy bom sampler quilt

DSC_0068 (2)

STEP 1 ~ I used an 8″  ez Dresden ruler to cut wedges from various fabric scraps that are 8″ in height x random width.

place ruler along bottom edge and cut first wedge

place ruler along bottom edge and cut first wedge

rotate wedge ruler 90 degrees to make second cut

rotate wedge ruler 180 degrees to make second cut

continue to rotate wedge ruler until you have the desired number of wedges.

continue to rotate wedge ruler 180 degrees after each cut until you have the desired number of wedges

STEP 2 ~ Piece together a background fabric piece (5.25″ height) to a colored fabric scrap (3.25″ height).

sew together ~ 1/4" seam allowance

sew together ~ 1/4″ seam allowance

Cut wedges in same manner as step 1 using pieced unit.

pieced unit will be 8" in height x random width

pieced unit will be 8″ in height x random width

cut pieced wedges in a variety of colors

STEP 3 ~ Piece together wedges.

arrange wedges in order

arrange wedges (alternating one solid and one pieced)  in pleasing order.

Step 4 ~ For each of the 4 border units, press under the short end 1/4″.

Step 5 ~ Pin 2 border units on long sides of quilt and sew in place using 1/4″ seam allowance. Pin border units on short sides of quilt and sew in place using 1/4″ seam allowance.

Step 6 ~ For each corner sew together 4 wedges (with white points) and slide units behind quilt top corners. 

quilt wedge border

Step 7

Center and slipstitch corner unit to borders.

quilt wedge border

Borders Done!

DSC_0048 borders

Find the Scrap Happy Sampler Quilt Pattern

with finishing scrappy border instructions

 in My Shop AND on Craftsy.

Scrap Happy Sampler Quilt Pattern

Playing Catch Up? ~

Complete the block patterns

Assemble/Sew using block layout

Add a quilt border

Make a quilt sandwich

Next steps are hand quilting

Making bias binding

Attaching the binding

And finishing with a label

If you like this tutorial

please share it…

Tutorial ~ how to make a scrappy quilt border with wedges

sherri

ps ~ those extra wedges are going into the next scrappy project!

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Craftsy

If you want to see more of this quilt, here are all the

RELATED POSTS:

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Countdown to Christmas ~ Hip Holiday Houses

hip holiday fabricI have a fun project to share with you today.  I know I’ve mentioned my love of the holidays with you already ~ and you also know I love a good challenge so when I stumbled upon the Holiday Challenge from Ruth at Sew Love Fabrics hosted by Rachel over at Stitched in Color  I couldn’t resist!  Look at the Yummy Fabric they sent me to play with!!  Six fat quarters from Artist Josephine Kimberling‘s new Hip Holiday collection!

I was in the  midst of setting up my Christmas Village… and that’s where my inspiration came from ~ How about some Hip Holiday Houses! (insert loud cheers!)

Department 56 North Pole Village display

Is it possible to resist such cuteness?  I think not!  Don’t you want to make a snowman?  Have a hot cocoa?  Watch a Wonderful Life?  You know you do!

North Pole Village Department 56 Display

All this happy inspiration was not lost on me!   I made my own happy hip holiday houses! (that’s a mouthful!)

House Shaped Pillows Sewing tutorial

I had so much fun with this project!  I got to play with a bunch of buttons and ribbons sparkly stuff in my stash…  Ellie couldn’t resist my  hip holiday houses… but she was a little upset I didn’t invite her to model ~ that’s her shy face… but she made the cut ~ more cuteness! Can’t even stand it!

Hip Holiday Houses sewing tutorial

This would make a sweet house warming gift! Free motion stitch or embroider ‘home’ on the door or a street address,  house number, family name  over the door :)

House Pillows sewing tutorial

 how to sew house shaped pillows tutorial Here’s a quick tutorial on how to put one together…

Gather your fabric and embellishment supplies  (ribbon etc)

how to make house shaped pillows sewing tutorial

1) Cut one 8.5″ W x 11″ H rectangle for the body of the house and a 9.25W x 8.5H rectangle for the roof.  Place them right sides together (roof will overhang on each side of body) and sew together with 1/4″ seam.

house shaped pillows tutorial

2) cut some roof ‘snow’ ~ use your rotary cutter and free hand a wavy line in a cut of fabric at least 9.25″Wide (as wide as roof) and aprox 2-3″ High.

house shaped pillows sewing tutorial

 3) Align your ‘snow’ along top edge of roof and attach by sewing around edges and add any trim you like.

DSC_0022

4) Trim left and right roof edges by measuring from the bottom corners in one inch from top corners.

house shaped pillows sewing tutorial

5) Add some trim to the seam where the roof meets the house body.  Place unit on top of some batting ~ I used warm and natural batting.  Quilt your house.  Add a door and windows to your liking.  I made a felt door embellished with ‘Hip Holiday’ from the fabric selvage and stitched it in place after my quilting was done.sewing holiday houses

6) Trim away excess batting after your quilting is done and repeat steps to make the back panel for your pillow.  I didn’t embellish the back but you can!

christmas pillows sewing tutorial

7) Place your panels right sides together and stitch around entire perimeter leaving generous opening at bottom.  Turn right side out, stuff and whip stitch opening closed.

christmas pillows sewing tutorial

8) ENJOY!

christmas pillows sewing tutorial

sewing tutorial hip holiday houses sewing tutorial

Check out what everyone else made in the challenge over at Stitched in Color and if you’re looking for some hip holiday fabric – hop over to Sew Love Fabrics for a fat quarter bundle.

sherri

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